media

3 reasons for failed pitches

If your media relations efforts are met with radio silence, you might be committing one of these mistakes. Here’s how to fix it.

Here are three common pitching foibles, along with how you can fix them:

1. Hogging the spotlight

Though you are writing a pitch to introduce a journalist to your brand and share why they should cover your story, don’t make the mistake of making it all about you.

Instead of touting all of your organization’s or client’s recent accomplishments and introducing outstanding new product offerings, make the pitch about the journalist and their readers. Share why your story will benefit them; you’ll be more likely to catch their attention.

2. Lengthy prose

It may take many paragraphs or pages to tell your full story, but writing a pitch is about spelling out the basics and teasing the journalist about the newsworthy qualities of your brand.

[RELATED: How to create shareable content by “newsjacking” breaking events.]

It’s best to leave out most of the information in favor of a few key details; if the reporter wants the full story, he or she will ask you for it.

3. Press release fatigue

A press release may cover all of the necessary information you are trying to convey, but they can bog down journalists who are looking for news.

Try pairing a press release with a quick email introduction highlighting its main bullet points and key takeaways. The reporter will appreciate you taking the time to craft a separate message and simplify the story.

Writing a pitch that’s only about you or your brand, drafting drawn out messages and flooding inboxes with press releases are good ways to ensure your emails end up in a reporter’s trash folder.

Source: 3 reasons for failed pitches | Articles | Home

  mesogio   Dec 04, 2015   journalism, media, PR/Media, press   Comments Off on 3 reasons for failed pitches Read More

Future Marketing Trends 2015 – Part 2 – Mobile Advertising

bend phoneRevolutionising the way we communicate via Facebook has become part of our everyday lives offering yet another groundbreaking device currently shaking up the mobile ad scene – and set to continue to do so in the years to come. Watch out for its ad buying service, soon to become known as “Atlas”, which aims to make all things mobile at same time as resolving previous cross-platform problems.

We recommend that marketers fully embrace this new advertising platform as studies prove that consumers are spending more and more of their time either online or on their mobile phones. Atlas offers real-time and customer-based impact assessment across devices replacing cookies to gather information and track consumer behaviour. In the future customers will be targeted depending on “who they are” instead of “which websites they use”. Facebook owns and gathers users personal information and it counts on selling and feeding marketers ads to their users. In the coming months, Facebook will track users’ journeys across desktop and mobile monitoring while informing advertisers if a user has seen or clicked their ad.

Meaning that from now on, no tracking data will be lost. Marketers can now simply track and follow their users mobile impressions as well as desktop conversations enabling them to analyse which advertisement strategy works best for their products.

In a nutshell, we really recommend marketers look into further investing into and establishing their mobile advertising on Facebook and into using Atlas as a platform to create, buy, measure and optimise digital campaigns. And remember, Mesogio are here to help! 🙂

Be well!

By Sarah Block

sb1Sarah is our current intern. She is a highly motivated and enthusiastic individual, with a strong belief in the European Union and its vast economic, political and social benefits. Due to her profound interest in economic relations she will be defending her Master Thesis in Economics in July 2015 – with her focus being on the European Union as a global economic actor and key driver of global economic prosperity.

Sarah successfully graduated from the Open University London in 2013, obtaining her Bachelors Degree in International Relations. Thereafter she started her Masters degree at CIFE almost straightaway. The Centre international de formation européenne, is a postgraduate degree programme specialised in political, public and current affairs which are one of her strength areas and form a major genuine interest. Intense face-to-face weekend workshops have brought her to Berlin, Rome, Budapest, Istanbul, Nice and Brussels where she has met representatives of EU institutions, national decision makers in charge of European and International matters and experts from the public and private sectors gaining great insights into the working environment of these organisations.

Sarah is a native German. She is fluent in English and does have a very basic vocabulary in French. You can contact her at: sarah.block@mesogio.info

  mesogio   Nov 05, 2014   2015 predictions, advertising, apps, digital media, media, mobile, social media, Social Media Strategy   Comments Off on Future Marketing Trends 2015 – Part 2 – Mobile Advertising Read More

3 reasons for failed pitches

If your media relations efforts are met with radio silence, you might be committing one of these mistakes. Here’s how to fix it.

Here are three common pitching foibles, along with how you can fix them:

1. Hogging the spotlight

Though you are writing a pitch to introduce a journalist to your brand and share why they should cover your story, don’t make the mistake of making it all about you.

Instead of touting all of your organization’s or client’s recent accomplishments and introducing outstanding new product offerings, make the pitch about the journalist and their readers. Share why your story will benefit them; you’ll be more likely to catch their attention.

2. Lengthy prose

It may take many paragraphs or pages to tell your full story, but writing a pitch is about spelling out the basics and teasing the journalist about the newsworthy qualities of your brand.

[RELATED: How to create shareable content by “newsjacking” breaking events.]

It’s best to leave out most of the information in favor of a few key details; if the reporter wants the full story, he or she will ask you for it.

3. Press release fatigue

A press release may cover all of the necessary information you are trying to convey, but they can bog down journalists who are looking for news.

Try pairing a press release with a quick email introduction highlighting its main bullet points and key takeaways. The reporter will appreciate you taking the time to craft a separate message and simplify the story.

Writing a pitch that’s only about you or your brand, drafting drawn out messages and flooding inboxes with press releases are good ways to ensure your emails end up in a reporter’s trash folder.

 

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  Max Terrorist   Jan 23, 2014   journalism, media, PR/media, press   Comments Off on 3 reasons for failed pitches Read More

method writing

I recently put my head around the similarities between method acting (theatre or cinema) and writing or moviemaking for audiences.

When we cast our minds back to Robert De Niro playing Jake La Motta in his oscar winning performance in Raging Bull – or even Daniel Day Lewis’ psychotic character in Gangs of New York – living in the heads of these characters shows immediate impact.

What do I mean I hear you muttering?

Think of it this way. If we start thinking like our audiences in terms of humans. If we put aside the fact that they are investors, or buyers, or citizens for one moment. And we step in the shoes of the character we are trying to convince them is credible, funny, smart, value for money or good for ethical reasons – then maybe we may be in the method writing/communicating experience.

Here are some interesting pointers:

Don’t objectivise your audience. They are not a ‘list’. They are not a demographic profile. They are human beings – individuals with the same hopes and fears you may have. It doesn’t matter if they are neurosurgeons or barristers, football fans or stay at home mumpreneurs, they are people.

What media do they consume? Which newspapers do they read? Which TV programmes do they watch? Which magazines do they buy? A stay at home mum will probably have a very different media consumption to a retired accountant. Consider adapting your content and approach to reflect this.

What are their preconceptions? What are their perceptions for the particular niche area or industry you are targeting? What are their hopes and fears?

And for mesogio – here is the GOLDEN RULE….

How do they speak or write? A youth market will have very different vocabulary and accepted use of syntax than say, a classics scholar. Go and hang out where they do – find related forums and note how your audience expresses themselves. Are there particular turns of phrase or niche words that are specific to them?


  mesogio   Apr 13, 2012   copywriter, editorial, media   Comments Off on method writing Read More

mesogio’ve moved!

It’s really that cold huh?!
I am in our living room sitting amidst a sea of boxes..most of which are still full. we said that we would unpack this weekend but I don’t see how that will happen.

cardboard box heaven
We need to go to Ikea later and by a desk and chair for myself and I can imagine us getting loads of other things too..bang goes that neat little nest egg 🙁
Here it snowed like crazy yesterday – I went out to open a bank account – Aurimas my buddy gave me a lift – thanks mate 😉 

When I came out of the bank I felt like I was back in Vilnius for a moment except that everybody and everything stops here as they’re not used to it the way people are in Lithuania.
Anyway mesogio now has its new headquarters in Brussels now and even if that means receiving a brief from a cardboard box – well that’s the way it’s got to be 🙂
Back with more soon

  mesogio   Feb 04, 2012   media   Comments Off on mesogio’ve moved! Read More

The Tweeting Dutchman/woman!

Semiocast has just released global rankings on the usage and popularity of twitter.

Our Dutch friends have just managed to edge past the Japanese by a sneaky, extra 3% and now occupy Her Majesty’s top spot!

Spain comes in at 3rd place while France and Germany are below Brazil, Turkey and Argentina.

Here’s a snapshot below:

Semiocast's Twitter rankings

  mesogio   Feb 04, 2012   funny, media, social media   Comments Off on The Tweeting Dutchman/woman! Read More